Tag Archives: Hera

Aphrodite: A Judgement of Paris

K4_5Hera

This Attic  red figure vase at Antikenmuseen in Berlin, Germany dates from the 5th century BC. Hermes (with the winged cap) leads the three goddesses Aphrodite (the figure in the middle), Athene and Hera to Paris for his judgement. The prize is a golden apple for the fairest. The Trojan prince sits in the doorway holding a royal staff and lyre. Before him stands Hermes, holding a kerykeion (herald’s wand) and wearing a chlamys (traveller’s cloak) and winged cap. Of the three goddesses, Aphrodite is veiled, and holds a winged Eros (god of love) and myrtle wreath in her hands; Athene holds a spear and helm; Hera is crowned and bears a miniature lion and royal lotus-tipped staff.
Tomorrow, more Aphrodite.

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The Olympians: Hera & Her Sisters

Hera (Juno)

Mount Olympus
 

When Zeus overthrew his father Cronos, he rescued his brothers Poseidon and Hades and sisters Hera, Ceres, and Hestia. Together, they cast Cronos into Tartarus. Then, they all ruled the world from Mount Olympus.

With her marriage to Zeus, Hera (Juno) became queen of the gods. She was also the goddess of the sky and heavens, women, marriage and family. Her symbols included the peacock, pomegranate, crown, cuckoo, lion and cow.  She was usually depicted as a beautiful woman wearing a crown and holding a royal, lotus-tipped staff. She was accompanied by a royal lion, cuckoo or hawk. She was known for seeking revenge against her unfaithful husband Zeus’ girlfriends and their families. 

Hestia (Vesta)

Hestia (Roman Vesta) was the goddess of the hearth, architecture, and of the right ordering of domesticity and the family. She received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household.  She presided over the cooking of bread and the preparation of the family meal. Hestia was also the goddess of the sacrificial flame and received a share of every sacrifice to the gods. She never married, despite being pursued by Apollo and Poseidon.  Instead, Zeus allowed her to reside at his royal hearth. Hestia was depicted as a modestly veiled woman sometimes holding a flowered branch. A kettle was her attribute.  The community hearth of a city served as her official sanctuary. With the establishment of a new colony, flame from Hestia’s public hearth in the mother city would be carried to the new settlement.

Demeter (Ceres)

Demeter (Ceres) was the goddess of fertility, agriculture, nature, and the seasons. Her symbols included the poppy, wheat, torch, and pig. Demeter was depicted as a mature woman, often crowned and holding sheaves of wheat and a torch.  As an Earth Mother figure, she was honored for providing food for the people of Earth. 

When Hades kidnapped her daughter Demeter and carried her to his realm as his queen, she wandered the earth searching for her daughter and mourning her loss.  Seeing the destruction she was causing, Zeus decreed that Persephone return to her mother IF she had not eaten anything while in the Underworld.  Since she had consumed six of the twelve seeds of a pomegranate, she had to remain with Hades for six months of the year.  Demeter mourned her loss, which is how winter came to the earth.

Tomorrow, The Olympians, Gen #2      Rita Bay

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Zeus & His Brothers

Zeus

When Cronos was defeated, his sons Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades divided the world among themselves.  Zeus (Roman name – Jupiter) was the king of the gods and ruler of Mount Olympus.  He was the god of the sky, thunder, weather, thunder, law, order, and fate. His symbols included the thunderbolt, eagle, oak tree, scepter and scales. He was depicted as a regal, mature man with a sturdy figure and dark beard. His attributes included the royal scepter and the lightning bolt. His sacred animals are the eagle and the bull. He was married to Hera.

Poseidon

Poseidon (Neptune) became the god of the seas, rivers, floods, droughts and earthquakes. He was known as the “Earth Shaker” and was the creator of horses. His symbols included the horse, bull, dolphin and trident. He was depicted as a mature man of sturdy build with a dark beard, and holding a trident. The horse and the dolphin were sacred to him.

 

Hades

Since he dwelled in the underworld, Hades (Pluto), the brother of Zeus and Poseidon, was not considered one of the twelve Olympians. He was king of the Underworld and the god of the dead and the hidden wealth of the Earth. His symbols are the key of Hades, the Helm of Darkness, and the three-headed dog, Cerberus. The screech owl was sacred to His consort was Persephone, a daughter of Ceres, whom he kidnapped from the earth and was allowed to keep with him for six months each year. A difficult situation, especially since Persephone was the daughter of Mother Nature.  Everyone knows you don’t mess with Mother Nature.

Tomorrow, Hera and her sisters.    Rita Bay

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