Tag Archives: Treasure of the British Museum

The Treasure of British Museum: The Rose Ash Bowl

The Rose Ash Bowl  Rose Ash, Devon, England    Iron Age, about 100 BC – AD 100 Discovered on a farm in Devon   Bronze bowl was made by hand from a single piece of bronze so delicate that had been broken and cracked when it was used in the Iron Age and clumsily repaired using solder.  © Trustees of the British Museum

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Treasure of the British Museum: The Salisbury Hoard

The Salisbury Hoard  Bronze Age and Iron Age, 2400-200 BC  Found at Netherhampton, near Salisbury, Wiltshire, England  The Salisbury Hoard is the largest group of prehistoric metal objects ever found in Britain. Most were miniature versions of objects such as shields, tools, daggers and spearheads. They were probably buried as offerings to ancient gods. The shields, for example, may have been intended to bring good luck in warfare. They were buried about 2000 years ago, at which time some of the objects were already 2000 years old. These were possibly Bronze Age objects dug up in the Iron Age and reburied with the other items.  © Trustees of the British Museum

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Treasure of the British Museum: Blacksmith’s Tools

Selection of blacksmith’s tools  Iron Age/Roman, 100 BC-AD 100 From the River Lea at Waltham Abbey, Essex, England  Tools used to make iron objects in Iron Age and Roman Britain. Any blacksmith’s forge of this time would have these objects – anvil, tongs, sledge hammer, chisel and poker. Tools had been bent or broken before they were placed in the River Lea at Waltham Abbey   © Trustees of the British Museum

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Treasure of the British Museum: Luxury imports

Luxury imports  Iron Age, 20 BC-AD 50   From Hertfordshire, England   French and Italian luxuries for Iron Age dinner parties    Entertaining guests become one way to show off importance and wealth. Those people who could afford them used very fine pottery plates, cups and flagons made in parts of France and Italy. The objects shown here were placed in graves as part of the new custom for cremation burials.   © Trustees of the British Museum

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Treasure of the British Museum: Lyngby Axe

Lyngby axe  Ahrensburgian, about 10,500 years old From Earls Barton, Northamptonshire, England  Weapon or tool made from reindeer antler found in a gravel pit by the River Nene.  Hunter-gatherers spread across the land bridge to England. They were possibly following reindeer herds, which were their main source of food and materials.  © Trustees of the British Museum

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