Category Archives: Pic of the Weekend

A “Modern” Judgement of Paris

JudofParisWagrez

This is a more modern Judgment of Paris.  Jacque Clement Wagrez (1850 – 1908) was a French painter and illustrator famous for painting the palaces of  the wealthy French. He studied in France and Italy. While he painted during the latter half of the 19th century, he garbed his models in Italian Renaissance clothing. Finding images of Aphrodite with clothes on has been a challenge.

Tomorrow, Author Liz Fountain Visits An Author’s Desk

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Vampires are NOT Good

Nosferatu1922Until the advent of a couple of vampire films twenty or so years ago, everyone knew that vampires are evil. But a few gorgeous vampires later, we’re supposed to be convinced that vampires are actually misunderstood because they live alternate lifestyles for many years and drink blood. My God, they drink blood!! They suck people’s blood away and those folks die or become vampires. The early moviemakers knew just how evil vampires were and portrayed them accordingly. Check out the pic from the movie Nosferatu from 1922. This creature is what I had in mind when I described the vampire who was the enemy of the Light Warriors. In The Aegis, Melinda opened the door to him but didn’t invite him inside. I wouldn’t invite him in either, if this creature knocked at my door: “In the glow of the streetlights, Fields looked ghastly. His face was a pasty grey-white. His blue eyes were glazed over like a dead fish. Mucous drained in tracks from the corners of his eyes down his cheeks. His thinning black hair straggled in greasy clumps around the leather tie that had bound it. Either his outdated black suit or Fields himself smelled like roadkill.”

The Aegis is available from Champagne Books HERE.     Tomorrow, Author Samantha Combs visits An Author’s Desk.

Junk

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Beaulieu Palace House & the Dissolution

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The Beaulieu Palace House is a 13th century house located in Beaulieu, Hampshire. It was originally built in the 13th century as the Great Gatehouse of Beaulieu Abbey and remains the ancestral home of a branch of the Montagu family since 1538, when it was granted to Thomas Wriothesley,1st Earl of Southampton to him by Henry VIII following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Wriothesley also received Titchfield (see yesterday’s post). Tomorrow, An Author’s Desk   Rita Bay

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Titchfield Abbey & the Dissolution

TichFieldAbbeyFront   imagesCAYFXXG1

The stately facade of Titchfield Abbey and the ruin it conceals. Titchfield Abbey is a medieval abbey and later country house of the Wriothesley family in Hampshire, England. The abbey was founded in 1222 for an austere order of priests. The inhabitants were devoted to scholarship, as shown by their very impressive library. Titchfield fell victim to the Dissolution in 1537 that was ordered by Henry VIII of England. Henry gave the building to Thomas Wriothesley, a powerful courtier who converted into a mansion. Later in the sixteenth century the abbey was home to Henry Wriothesley, who was a patron of William Shakespeare. In 1781 the abbey was abandoned and partially demolished to create a romantic ruin. It is now part of English Heritage. Tomorrow, Another Ruin  Rita Bay

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Mathew Brady: Weekend Pics

Robert E_ Lee just days after his surrender at Appomattox Court House by Matthew Brady, April 1865       General George Armstrong Custer by Matthew Brady, 1864

Two Mathew Brady pics document a Civil War winner and loser. Robert E. Lee, leader of the Confederate forces, was photographed only days after surrendering at Appomattox which was a death-blow to the Confederate forces that was only half that of the Federal military.

Also pictured is General George Armstrong Custer, a victorious Federal officer. Custer after being returned to his regular commission as a Colonel, was died with his men at Little Big Horn in the Indian wars a decade later. Tomorrow, Audra Middleton Visits A Writer’s Desk. Rita Bay

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The Aging of a President: Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln 1860 Brady             last-lincoln-1865 4-10

Abraham Lincoln served as President from 1861-1865. He served through the Civil War, often sitting at night in the War Office to monitor the course of the War. During his Presidency he lost two sons, one to illness and the other to an accident.  Scientists and historians speculate if he suffered from a significant disease. Regardless of the reason, Lincoln aged significantly while he was president. Check out these pictures taken in 1860 (on left) and 1865. What a change!  Tomorrow, Pippa Jay at An Author’s Desk   Rita

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The Earliest Photo of Lincoln

lincoln1848  Kaplan Lincoln

The photo on the left is the oldest known photo of Abraham Lincoln. It was donated by a Lincoln relative to the Library of Congress. Albert Kaplan bought a daguerreotype of a young man Kaplan believed could be a young Lincoln in 1840. Kaplan had the pic tested by experts who determined that it could well be the earliest known portrait of Lincoln. Lincoln who was several inches over six feet had lost forty pounds in the early 1840s, possibly as a result of a serious bout with depression. Both pictures have the disfiguration of his forehead Lincoln was known to have from being kicked by a horse and knocked unconscious.   Tomorrow, More Lincoln.  Rita Bay

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Death Mask #2 of Mary Queen of Scots

Painted Death Mask

On the right is another death mask of Mary Queen of Scots. This one is very unusual because it has been painted and dressed with a wig. Mary was noted for her remarkable beauty. She had red hair and was almost six feet tall, extremely tall for the time. Mary was only 42 when she was executed on the order of her older cousin, Queen Elizabeth Tudor of England. Elizabeth was rumored to have said that Mary won in the end because Mary had a son who would inherit both the thrones of Scotland and England while Elizabeth had never married. Tomorrow, The Price of Treason. Rita Bay

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Poe’s “The Raven” by Manet

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While Poe was popular in America, he was idolized in Europe. Unfortunately the lack of an international copyright law kept him from earning significant amounts of money. The Impressionist artist Edouard Manet painted his version the iconic pic of “The Raven,” with the young man looking up at the raven that sits on the statue of the head of Pallas.
Next Week, Mary, Queen of Scots Rita Bay

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The Mystery of the Faked Portraits

PoeWife

Virginia Poe (Mrs. Edgar Allan Poe) was noted for her beauty but the only picture known to be her that survives is her death portrait, a watercolor. Over the years numerous paintings have been offered up for sale but none have had any evidence presented to prove that the portrait is of Virginia Poe. Several years ago, a portrait surfaced purporting to be Virginia. This portrait, however, was produced by a descendent of Virginia’s family. No proof, except for the family traditions. If this were actually a portrait of Virginia, wouldn’t the family have come forward sooner? Don’t know, but check it out.

Tomorrow, Another Pic

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