Category Archives: Event of the Week

Ration Books in WWII

Not all products were available during WWII. Items such as cars, tires, appliances, clothing, certain food items (including meat) were reserved for the war effort. Those items that were available in limited amounts were rationed. Ration books were issued to citizens to use when they purchased items. Different stamps in the books were used to purchase specific items, including alcohol. (True Story: Lt. Marie obtained her first ration book when a relative who liked to drink took her to register and obtain her book on her 21st birthday. He immediately relieved her of the alcohol stamps.)

Ration BookSM

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WWII – Caught on Camera #1

Walter Reed Hospital in Washington DC provided occupational therapy for the patients. Photography was one of the classes offered. Consequently, when Lt Marie was on duty, she never knew when a pic would be snapped. In this pic she was charting at the nurses desk.

MarieDeskWaltReedSM

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Conquering Cupid’s Release Day

Love and lust, the perfect mix for a happily ever after. Conquering Cupid , which has a bit of BDSM with a chuckle, is my first story in the “Cupid’s Back in Business” humorous, contemporary, mythological series from Champagne Book Group.

Blurb

ConqueringCupid180x280JWhen popular artist Diana Harper dumped her cheating fiancé and accepted an invitation “to attend a private event at Miss A’s island retreat to experience your most secret dreams and fondest fantasies,” her hostess gave her Teddy as an “attendant.” Despite his best efforts, Teddy is no submissive. Diana, however, plays his game for the profound passion, the best sex ever, and love that could last a lifetime.

Billionaire philanthropist Theodore Cooper “Coop” Bareston III fell in love with Diana when he saw her working out at his elite gym in New York City. He was willing to do anything to win her love, including wearing a skimpy thong in his “Teddy” role and posing nude in chains when Di’s interest in her art revived. As the sexual tension builds and passions explode, Teddy discovers he is intensely aroused by  playing the submissive.

After moving into Coop’s East Side penthouse, Diana is sucked into a world inhabited by supernatural denizens with powers beyond her imagination. Can she survive the challenges confronting her to live in Coop’s world or will she turn her back on the extraordinary destiny within her grasp?

BUY LINKS Amazon  / Champagne  / AllRomance

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The Star-Spangled Banner

THE STORY OF STAR-SPANGLED BANNER

Meet Francis Scott Key, a young lawyer from Maryland. In 1814 towards the end of the War of 1812, Key who was a lawyer and an amateur poet was negotiating a prisoner exchange with the British.  He was aboard the HMS Tonnant on the night of September 13 and 14 when the British fleet bombarded Fort McHenry in Baltimore.

Through the rockets red glare and the bombs bursting in air, Key was able to see that the American flag at Fort McHenry was still waving and reported it to the American prisoners below deck.  The experience inspired Key to write and publish the poem “The Defence of Fort McHenry”, which was published on September 20, 1814. It was placed to music and has become known as “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

The first and last of the four stanzas are provided below.  The fourth stanza (seldom read and never sung) epitomizes the concepts of American exceptionality, reliance on God and appreciation for God-given liberties which, though profound beliefs of American citizens for more than two centuries, have been questioned by some today.


The Star-Spangled Banner

O say can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight
O’er the ramparts we watch’d were so gallantly streaming?
And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there,
O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand
Between their lov’d home and the war’s desolation!
Blest with vict’ry and peace may the heav’n rescued land
Praise the power that hath made and preserv’d us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto – “In God is our trust,”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

The original Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired Key, is one of the most treasured artifacts in the collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington,D.C.

To read more about Key and the Star Spangled Banner:  http://francisscottkey.com/

Rita Bay – WEBPAGE & BLOG / FACEBOOK / PINTEREST / AMAZON

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Egyptian Monument Used to Destroy Plague Corpses

Egypt-epidemic-discovery-1Archaeologists working at the Funerary Complex of Harwa and Akhimenru in the west bank of the ancient city of Thebes uncovered the gruesome remains of a body-clearing operation created during an epidemic that ravaged Thebes in the third century A.D. The epidemic in Egypt was so terrible that one ancient writer believed the world was coming to an end. (The writer – St. Cyprian and Cyprian’s Plague will be featured next week.)

Egypt-epidemic-discovery-coffins used in kilnsThe archaeologists found bodies covered with a thick layer of lime (historically used as a disinfectant). The researchers also found three kilns where the lime was produced, as well as a giant bonfire containing human remains, where many of the plague victims were incinerated.

Egypt-epidemic-discovery-2nd secADcoffinfaceCheck out the pics of the fire pit with skulls and the coffins and coffin fragments that were burned as fuel in the kilns. (So much for living forever. I knew mummies were burned for fuel in Egypt at one time, but really!)

Credit: Photos by N. Cijan.

Tomorrow, All about Harwa

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A Vintage Postcard & Traveling the Net

Lots going on today. I’m blogging at Dawn’s Reading Nook about my first plunge into writing an erotic romance – Gods & Goddesses in an Erotic Romance Series – OH MY!  Her Teddy Bare – an installment in Carnal Passion’s Aphrodite’s Island Series—is a light BDSM with a chuckle. Click HERE to check out my blog at Dawn’s Reading Nook Blog.

ALSO, I’ve posted my interview on The Next Big Thing Blog Hop at my group blog, Southern Sizzle Romance.  Check it out HERE.  Thanks to Celia Breslin for tagging me.

Below I’m sharing a vintage postcard from my ancestor’s stash. The vintage cards this week date from 1907 -1909 and feature water scenes from Mobile, AL – my home town and the location for my first contemporary military romance from Secret Cravings, Search & Rescue.

Moonlight on Mobile Bay 1909

Tomorrow, More About Mullets.   Rita Bay

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The Day After – July 5th 1776

DecIndThe Committee of Five (John Adams, Roger Sherman, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Livingston, and Thomas Jefferson) who was responsible for writing and editing the Declaration of Independence finished their work the first of July. According to John Adams, the Continental Congress reconvened and, after discussion and editing, was ready for approval by the third. Congress convened on the fourth, formally adopted the Declaration on the morning of the fourth, and returned it to the Committee to make the approved changed and deliver it to the printer, John Dunlap. On the 5th of July printed copies (See Pic) were sent to the states for ratification. The final copies were signed “JOHN HANCOCK, President, Signed by order and in behalf of the Congress.

On Jul 5th, 1776 John Adams wrote: “Yesterday the greatest question was decided that was ever debated in America; and greater, perhaps, never was or will be decided among men. A resolution was passed, without one dissenting colony, ˜That these United States are, and of right ought to be free and independent states. The day passed. The 4th of July, 1776, will be a memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.  It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to Almighty God. It ought to be solemnized with pomp, shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of the continent to the other, from this time forward, forever. You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not.
I am well aware of the toil, and blood, and treasure, that it will cost to maintain this declaration, and support and defend these states; yet through all the gloom, I can see the rays of light and glory. I can see that the end is worth more than all the means; and that posterity will triumph …”

This weekend, more pics. Rita Bay

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Independence Day, 1819

4th-of-July-1819-Philadelphia-John-Lewis-Krimmel

Independence Day Celebration in Centre  Square in Philadelphia in 1819

This year’s 4th of July pic is by John Lewis Krimmel (1786- 1821),  a German immigrant. The tent of the left has a U.S. flag above a portrait of George Washington above a depiction of a naval battle of the War of 1812 (with slogan “Don’t give up the Ship”). The tent on the right has a flag of the state of Pennsylvania (motto “Virtue, Liberty, Independence”) above a depiction of “The Battle of New Orleans.” Benjamin Latrobe’s waterworks building is in the background.  (Source: WikiCommons) 

Loving this painting. Since it was painted in 1819, there could be Revolutionary and War of 1812 heroes pictured. 

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Medal of Honor Recipient, John Cooper

Only nineteen members of the military have received the TWO Medals of Honor. John Cooper (AKA John Laver Mather Cooper), a Coxswain in the US Navy during the Civil War received two for his actions in the Battle of Mobile Bay and its aftermath. Cooper was born in Ireland in 1832 and lived in New York. Cooper died on August, 22, 1891 and is buried in Brooklyn, NY.

Citation
On board the U.S.S. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Cooper fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

SECOND AWARD Served as quartermaster on Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher’s staff. During the terrific fire at Mobile, on 26 April 1865, at the risk of being blown to pieces by exploding shells, Cooper advanced through the burning locality, rescued a wounded man from certain death, and bore him on his back to a place of safety. G.O. No.: 62, 29 June 1865.

I LOVE pics but was unable to discover a pic of Cooper. Please share, if you have it. Tomorrow, Another MOH Recipient. Rita Bay

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Double Medal of Honor Recipient

CusterTHOMAS W. CUSTER, brother of the famous General George Armstrong Custer, was one of only nineteen recipients of TWO medals of honor. Thomas W. Custer, Company B, 6th Michigan Cavalry, was only 18 years old when he earned his first Medal of Honor on May 10, 1863, at Namozine Church, Virginia, by capturing an enemy flag. Two years later, Custer captured a Confederate color guard, in spite of being shot in the place.
Riding up to his brother Brevet Major General George A. Custer, the lieutenant told him, “The Rebels shot me, but I have their flag.” He turned to return to the fight, but the general, realizing the severity of Tom’s wounds, ordered him to the rear. His brother refused, so the young major general placed him under arrest and had him escorted to the aid station. Custer died on Jun. 25, 1876 with his brother in battle at Little Big Horn. He is buried at Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery.

Tomorrow, Another Double Winner                Rita Bay

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