Book of Common Prayer Regency Marriage Service

 
Marriage of George IV
 After King Henry VIII broke with the Catholic Church in the 16th century, the Church of England had to develop a common liturgy that reflected the beliefs of the new religion. 
 
During the reign of Edward VI, Henry’s son, the clergy developed The Book of Common Prayer. The book which included the prayers and regular services, and form of occasional services—baptism, confirmation, marriage, prayer for the sick, and a funeral service, was suppressed by Edward’s successor Queen Mary Tudor who attempted to restore the Catholic faith. After her death, her sister Queen Elizabeth returned to the Protestant religion and the Book of Common Prayer became the standard for the Church of England.  Later versions updated the services.  Excerpts of the marriage service used during the Regency (1815 edition) are featured in today’s post:

 

Wilt thou have this Woman to thy wedded wife, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honour, and keep her in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto her, so long as ye both shall live?

The Man shall answer, I will.

Then shall the Priest say unto the Woman,

With thou have this Man to thy wedded husband, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou obey him, and serve him, love, honour, and keep him in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto him, so long as ye both shall live?

The Woman shall answer,    I will.

Then shall the Minister say,

Who giveth this Woman to be married to this Man?

Then shall they fire their troth to each other this manner.

The Minister, recessing the Woman at her father’s or friend’s hands, shall cause the Man with his right hand to take the Woman by her right hand, and to say after him as followeth.

I take thee N. to my wedded wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I plight thee my troth.

 Then shall they loose their hands; and the Woman, with her right hand taking the Man by his right hand, shall likewise say after the Minister,

I take thee M. to my wedded husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love, cherish, and to obey, till death us do part, according to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I give thee my troth.

WITH this Ring I thee wed, with my body I thee worship, and with all my worldly goods I thee endow: In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen. 

Pride & Prejudice

Google Books contains the numerous editions of The Book of Common.  You can read the read the entire 1815 Wedding Service in the Behind the Scenes page at RitaBay.com: 

Tomorrow, Not a Morganatic Duo     RitaBay

2 Comments

Filed under Wednesday's Words

2 responses to “Book of Common Prayer Regency Marriage Service

  1. Wha

    so long as ye both shall liver?

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